07/06/2021

EU to defend journalists from malicious law suits

Investigative journalism in Europe needs "legal" protection from the growing problem of malicious law suits, the European Commission and MEPs have said. The Commission is to put forward new measures to protect journalists later this year, including a "legislative component" as well as non-binding recommendations, EU values commissioner Věra Jourová said.

Source: EU Observer

07/06/2021

Russian government submits bill to enable sanctions against any foreign national

The Russian government has submitted a bill to the State Duma, which would allow for imposing visa and financial sanctions against any foreign citizen and stateless person. The proposed amendments would be made to the “Dima Yakovlev law,” which currently only allows for imposing sanctions against U.S. citizens.

Source: Meduza

15/06/2021

Greek unions launch general strike against labor reforms

Large parts of Greece shut down on Thursday as workers across the country joined a general strike to protest a proposed labor reform. Workers' organisations have called for rejection of a controversial bill that they fear will dismantle the eight-hour work day. Demonstrations are planned across the country.

Source: DW

15/06/2021

European Commission threatens to sue Germany over EU law supremacy dispute

The European Commission launched legal proceedings against Germany over a controversial ruling at the country's constitutional court, arguing that "the integrity" of EU law was at stake. The underlying dispute broke out last year when the German constitutional court ruled that the European Central Bank’s 2015 bond-buying program would be illegal under German law unless the central bank could prove the purchases were justified.

Source: Politico

15/06/2021

Hungary’s ruling party proposes ban on LGBT content aimed at children

Hungary's ruling nationalist party, Fidesz, has submitted legislation to ban content it sees as promoting homosexuality and gender change to minors. The draft law would ban LGBT literature for under-18s, including educational material, and advertisements deemed to be promoting gay rights. Several human rights groups denounced it, saying it was similar to Russian restrictions on LGBT activities.

Source: BBC

15/06/2021

Rape now defined as sex without consent in Slovenia in ‘historic victory’ for women

Slovenia has passed a new law which means rape is now defined as sex without consent in a move campaigners hailed as a “historic victory” for women. The country’s criminal code will no longer consider coercion, the use or threat of force, or not being able to defend oneself as the only conditions for an assault to be deemed as rape.

Source: Independent

15/06/2021

Russian State Duma adopts law banning involvement in ‘undesirable organisations’

The Russian State Duma has adopted in the third and final reading a law banning Russian citizens and legal entities from involvement in the work of “undesirable organisations” around the world. The legislation also allows for any foreign or international NGO to be designated as “undesirable,” if it helped transfer money or other assets to an organization that is already on this blacklist.

Source: Meduza

22/06/2021

EU commission takes stand against Danish asylum law

The European Commission has taken a firm stand against Denmark's plan to outsource asylum. EU home affairs commissioner Ylva Johansson warned the law could create a "knock-on effect to neighbouring EU countries" ant that it goes against the Geneva Convention on refugees

Source : EU Observer

22/06/2021

Court rules that Belgium’s climate failures violate human rights

Belgium’s failure to meet climate targets is a violation of human rights, a Brussels court has ruled, in the latest legal victory against public authorities that have broken promises to tackle the climate emergency. Judges declared that the Belgian state had committed an offence under Belgian’s civil law and breached the European convention on human rights. The NGO that brought the case, Klimaatzaak, hails the judgment as historic.

Source: The Guardian